Whiteness

nabyss:

fleursdegrasse:

Do we all face stereotypes, of courseThe question is, do all stereotypes carry the same weight ?

This.

charlesreneer:

In the U.S., during the 1800s and early 20th Century, both Jews and Italian immigrants were subject to extreme prejudice, racism, and, in many cases, violence. During this time, both groups were seen as non-Anglo and non-white. In fact, Italian Americans were the second most…

karnythia:

Children of color are old enough to face racism when they’re born. Old enough to bear the weight of stereotypes & hate before their little eyes can focus. But somehow white kids are supposed to be too delicate & too shielded to even know race exists because somehow that might hurt them. When your definition of innocent child doesn’t include my babies? I know what you’re on & I don’t have any patience for the lies you tell yourself or your children.

helvetebrann:

stfusexists:

siddharthasmama:

anomaly1:

emiliogorgeous:

s/o to the black man. 

#black father supremacy

everyone needs to know this.

It’s important to realize that many of the biases that we have and that are reinforced by people in positions of power are baseless.

End the stereotype.
Share the fuck out of this.

The Kidnapping of a King: How the media has sanitized the legacy of Dr. King

chescaleigh:

subversivesentences:

             image

Today marks the 28th Martin Luther King Jr. Day.  It also marks 28 years of reducing the legacy of radical social justice and antiwar activist into that of loving quotes on racial reconciliation. Ultimately, think back to what you were taught about Dr. King and you’ll most likely remember his role in bus boycotts, sit-ins, and famous speeches. Like the memorial erected for him in Washington D.C., the meaning of Dr. King’s legacy has been ossified by the establishment into one of nonviolence and love.  What you are not taught is that Dr. King’s concept of love manifested in his theories on social justice, economic equity, human rights, and global war. Today, the establishment that hated Dr. King markets an illusion of who he was.  I’ll let the good Doctor make his own case:

 On war, capitalism, and civil rights

“I am convinced that if we are to get on the right side of the world revolution, we as a nation must undergo a radical revolution of values. We must rapidly begin the shift from a thing-oriented society to a person-oriented society. When machines and computers, profit motives and property rights are considered more important than people, the giant triplets of racism, materialism, and militarism are incapable of being conquered.”

 On economic justice 

“True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar; it comes to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring. ”

On internal colonialism

“The purpose of the slum is to confine those who have no power and perpetuate their powerlessness. The slum is little more than a domestic colony which leaves its inhabitants dominated politically, exploited economically, segregated and humiliated at every turn.”

On Jim Crow as both racial and class warfare 

"The Southern aristocracy took the world and gave the poor white man Jim Crow…And when his wrinkled stomach cried out for the food that his empty pockets could not provide, he ate Jim Crow, a psychological bird that told him that no matter how bad off he was, at least he was a white man, better than a black man."

**

You were probably taught that Dr. King’s harshest critics were white southerners and more radical elements within the movement like Malcolm X. The truth is that during his life the mainstream media criticized Dr. King. On his stance on the Vietnam War, Life magazine described his speeches as “demagogic slander that sounded like a script for Radio Hanoi.”

During his life, Dr. King was not well received by the establishment. In the years since his death in 1968, his image and political significance have been sanitized and neutralized. He serves as a mouthpiece for love and compassion as the keys of historical progress. What one should remember was that Dr. King was intensely critical of the capitalist state, global war, and separating economic rights from civil rights. What Dr. King was for was protest, education and direct action. If you truly honor Dr. King and his legacy, you honor the core values of what he stood for.

Bookmarking for future convos where “MLK would be disappointed in you!” inevitably comes up. 

I really don’t think we’re going to end racism by joking about it. Like i’m glad that the white liberals feel like they are less racist because they can joke about people who are more explicitly racist but that actually does nothing to help people of color
whitecolonialism:

Oh white colonialism..

whitecolonialism:

Oh white colonialism..